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How do you set the stage for a new arena in a jam-packed city?

When the NBA’s Brooklyn Nets decided to call Brooklyn’s new Barclays Center home, the community needed a major infrastructure facelift. Our team partnered with project sponsor Forest City Ratner Companies to design a new subway entrance, vehicular bridge, and other improvements to accommodate the arena. These upgrades now make it easier to get to and from one of the country’s busiest—and hippest—neighborhoods.

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Lines through station

Nine subway lines run through the station carrying hipsters, shoppers, and sports fans to their various destinations.

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Brooklynites use transit

Sixty-six percent of Brooklyn residents commute by public transit daily.

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Subway riders

On game days, the Barclays Center Station can accommodate the nine thousand extra riders taking the subway.

Using our design as a guide, the construction team moved in equipment, switched over utilities, and rebuilt a bridge after dusk. By saving the big work for the wee hours, we could keep Brooklyn up and running.

Stay on track

Making way for the new arena meant reconfiguring the active Long Island Rail Road tracks that lead into the underground station. These tracks carry some of the busiest commuter rail lines in the country: up to 20 trains enter and leave the rail yard on any given day.

Part of the design involved reconstructing the Carlton Avenue Bridge to provide enough clearance for trains in the newly reconfigured rail yard. The catch? The trains had to keep running throughout bridge construction. 

The plan called for excavation on the north side of the yard and a rebuild of half the bridge. This would allow the trains to use the tracks on the other side. Once that half was complete, the whole thing would get flipped. Excavation would take place on the south side while construction would happen on the other half of the bridge.

Transcript of the video follows
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<p><b>VO:</b><i> </i>Constant. That’s how we describe the flow of people moving in and out of the average New York City subway station. But the new Barclays Center station is far from average. It serves the 2.5 million people who call Brooklyn home, and an additional 9,000 people on game days when the Brooklyn Nets take on opponents at the Barclays Center arena.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This constant and busy flow of people was at the heart of the station’s design. With the station’s doorstep so close to the arena, it’s easy for people to figure out where they’re going and how they’ll get there.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Greg Lowe, FCRC:</b> “The new station entrance that we built here, brought the people right from the tracks and subway, right up to our front door of the arena. So they didn’t have to cross over any streets. It brought them right to the plaza, and right to the front door.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>VO:</b> Inside the station, that simple, clear access remained the name of the game. People could make their way through the large, column-free space, find the turnstiles, and take the grand staircase to the arena.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Susan Walter, Stantec:</b> “The idea was to create an entrance that was really right at the door to the arena. That people could come out of the subway and not have to navigate through the city streets, not have to cross a four, five, six-lane roadway that’s always chock-a-block full of traffic.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>VO:</b> Through collaboration and strong relationships with our client and other project team members, we were able to keep the crowds moving on game day, and every other day in between.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Ted Civetta, Civetta &amp; Sons:</b> “Well, it was a very complex project, and we had a very tight schedule. And frankly, it was successful really because we could make changes and develop solutions to problems at a moment’s notice. I’ve been in this business for over forty years and in all my time in construction, I’ve never seen this level of cooperation between ownership and engineering.”</p>

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Stuart Lerner
Senior Vice President, Business Leader, Transportation & Sector Leader, Transit/Rail
Stuart Lerner
Senior Vice President, Business Leader, Transportation & Sector Leader, Transit/Rail

As a frequent user of mass transit, I have a great appreciation for its evolution into a transportation mode that will be sustainable for the next generation.… Read More

Susan Walter
Vice President, Regional Business Leader, Transportation (US Southeast & Mid Atlantic)
Susan Walter
Vice President, Regional Business Leader, Transportation (US Southeast & Mid Atlantic)

My favorite part of working on complex engineering projects is collaborating with the entire team – engineers, contractors, owners and clients.… Read More

Stéphane Lefebvre
Associate
Stéphane Lefebvre
Associate

Our driving force is to create iconic buildings and infrastructure that exceed client goals, embolden cityscapes, and empower communities.… Read More

Christopher Yorlano
Engineering Designer
Christopher Yorlano
Engineering Designer

I apply my knowledge as a commuter to my transportation work to ensure that the public enjoys the same quality commuting experience as I do.… Read More

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